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4.

Addiction
Therapy

Intensive Outpatient Treatment

Outpatient substance treatment is less restrictive than inpatient programs. Outpatient recovery programs usually require 10 to 12 hours a week of treatment. These sessions focus on drug abuse education, individual and group counseling, and teaching addicted people how to cope without their drug.

Individualized Counseling

Individuals attending an IOP will oftentimes participate in individualized therapy and counseling. Individual therapy sessions serve as a time for patients to meet one-on-one with a licensed professional in a confidential setting. These sessions can be a time for individuals to find the root cause of addiction, process their experiences in treatment, ask any questions they may have, and celebrate recovery successes. In an intensive outpatient program setting, these therapy sessions are most commonly held weekly or bi-weekly and on an as-needed basis.

Group Therapy

Group therapy sessions are generally the chief counseling component of IOPs. The number and types of groups that meet will vary from program to program and are based on the needs of the participants. Some groups may be specialized and focused on a single type of client, such as gender, sexual orientation, or abuse survivors. These therapy sessions are led by professionals that facilitate topics of discussions that are relevant to the needs of the individuals who are taking part in the program. These sessions not only allow patients to receive valuable education and advice on addiction topics that pertain to them, but also give and receive support from peers. Group therapy fosters an environment where people in similar situations can provide acceptance, support, comfort, and honest feedback for one another.

Social Support 

Outpatient substance treatment is the next step in treatment after detoxing from substances, and provides ongoing support while transitioning to life sober.  Outpatient treatment centers usually conduct meetings at night or in the early morning, helping those in the program maintain their normal schedules.

Twelve-step groups like Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) may be used as part of outpatient treatment. Studies show that participating in recovery groups like AA and NA helps recovering addicts stay sober. Many individuals with a substance use disorder (SUD) also turn to outpatient treatment after completing an inpatient program as part of their continued recovery.

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